Military Technology of The First World War by Wolfgang Fleischer    This is not your typical book about arms and...

Military Technology of The First World War by Wolfgang Fleischer Military Technology of The First World War by Wolfgang Fleischer

Military Technology of The First World War by Wolfgang Fleischer

Military Technology of The First World War by Wolfgang Fleischer



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 This is not your typical book about arms and armaments of a certain period. It does not have just one or two pages about each weapon along with its specifications, along with a small write up on its usage. This book is an overview of all of the weapons and different technologies of the war. The chapters are:

The Administration of Scarcity
Machine Guns In The First World War
Trench Warfare And Geology
The Rise Of Artillery
Tanks
Chemical warfare
From The Catapult To The Mortar
Flamethrowers In Place of Fire Extinguishers
Motor Vehicles In Field Gray
From The Eye In The Sky To The Fist Of The Military Leadership

 Machine guns are gone over in detail, as they should be. Their development changed warfare tremendously. The book goes into the various countries' early machine guns, and how their armies attempted to come up with tactical plans for their usage.

 The pictures in the book are incredible. They not only show a large amount of obscure armaments, but also allow us to glimpse the life of a soldier from a hundred years ago. The illustrations of bunkers, guns, and ammo teaches you how the war's nuts and bolts really worked.

 The section on trenches describe not only the trenches themselves, but all of the defensive measures taken. On page fifty-nine is something I had never read about before. It shows a British Mark IV tank overturned in what can only be described as a 'Tiger trap' built for tanks. Simple yes, but incredibly effective.

 The section on artillery shows many different guns from all of the combatants, many that I had never seen a picture of. The pictures of gas mortar batteries are especially sinister looking.

 The chapter on mortars alone is worth the price of the book. Many books on World War I artillery pay scant or no attention to this weapon. On page 148 there is a drawing of a makeshift German 24kg 'mortar' in the loosest use of the word. It is really an iron pot with two attached rails to it. Just looking at it makes me feel for the extremely gallant or foolhardy soldiers who had to use them. There is even an illustration of a German spring catapult to toss grenades or gas bombs. This chapter is especially full of one of a kind photos and illustrations.

 For those interested in the military technology of the First World War, this book is an instant buy. For those of us who are interested in obscure and sometimes one of a kind weapons this should also be on your shelf.


Robert


Publisher: Pen And Sword
Distributor: Casemate Publishers

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